Pre-1900s pictures of giant trees in Surrey

A reminder of what we lose when we develop without the long term vision in mind. The tree in the bottom photo was estimated to be 1000 years old. Those can’t be replaced.
Trees help clean the air and help slow rainfall. Without trees we get overflowing storm drains and flooding. We get eroded creek banks. Come to my neighbourhood, I’ll show you what the loss of trees and the dramatic increase in storm water run-off has done to the banks of Henry Bose Creek in my back yard. Trees are falling into the water at an alarming rate.
Development is inevitable. That’s not my point. We need to develop our city in a smarter, more sustainable way. People, it’s not rocket science. We need to plan and develop Surrey for its citizens and their quality of life, or we risk losing it all in the name of greed.

Save Sunnyside Trees

All (?) the giant trees are gone from Surrey, but there are some pictures of them. I searched Surrey Archives for “tree” and here are some of the neat pictures of ancient trees in the PNW! The captions are from their database.

View of Martin Saarela (faller) standing next to tree. Lived on Bose Road east of the Bose Farm. Tree felled on Bose Farm, 74" in diameter. pre-1960 View of Martin Saarela (faller) standing next to tree. Lived on Bose Road east of the Bose Farm. Tree felled on Bose Farm, 74″ in diameter. pre-1960

Jimmie Dicil, Bert McIntyre and Joe Ralph stand next to stump of fallen tree at Pike and Townline Road. 1895 Jimmie Dicil, Bert McIntyre and Joe Ralph stand next to stump of fallen tree at Pike and Townline Road. 1895

Jimmie Dicil, Bert McIntyre and Joe Ralph sit atop stump of fallen tree at Pike and Townline Road. 1895 Jimmie Dicil, Bert McIntyre and Joe Ralph sit atop stump of fallen tree at Pike and Townline Road. 1895

Mr. I. Donald standing beside felled giant tree. 196_ Mr. I. Donald standing beside felled giant tree. 196_

 Felling a tree - South Surrey. 1906 Felling a tree – South Surrey. 1906

Loggers stand in front of large cedar tree near the Duckabush River. pre-1930 Loggers stand in front of large cedar tree near the Duckabush River. pre-1930

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